4 Alternative Treatments For Postpartum Depression You Need To Know About

Tuesday, July 12, 2016 by Meg   •   Filed under Postpartum Depression


Postpartum depression can rear its ugly, no-good, dirty, rotten head anytime, including during pregnancy as discussed at length in the last post. And the earlier it begins, the more reluctant women tend to be about beginning drug treatment. Many women choose to forgo drug treatment altogether in the postpartum period, making it critical to find alternative therapies--though make no mistake, medications can be lifesavers for those suffering severe bouts of depression, anxiety or other conditions. So what to do? It isn't like we can just toss these women aside, unless you're Rush Limbaugh, in which case this is perfectly reasonable. I mean, about as reasonable as Rush fucking goats which I heard was totally his weekend guilty pleasure. 

Ahem. 

Alright, let us forgo the beastiality for a moment and get back to the issue at hand: how to help the ladies who are uncomfortable with medication management during pregnancy and the postpartum period deal with a depressive episode. Because in addition to the standard advice of talk therapy and increased social support, there are a few other options for decreasing depressive symptoms postpartum....  continue reading

Is This Thought Normal or is it Postpartum Depression? The Top 5 Scary Thoughts After Birth

Friday, January 23, 2015 by Meg   •   Filed under Postpartum Depression

In the past I have written extensively about postpartum depression, from the evolutionary drives to abandon when stressed, to the importance of support, to the influence of hormones to the difference between PPD and postpartum psychosis (Check out the posts linked at the bottom of this article). But even with a symptom checklist, many don’t recognize the symptoms for what they are. Part of the reason for this is that the thoughts that accompany PPD may resemble normal thought patterns in new moms. So, I decided to create a different kind of checklist to help you differentiate between normal worries and signs of postpartum depression.  ...  continue reading

Do I Have PPD? The Somewhat Official Postpartum Depression Symptom Checklist

Sunday, September 21, 2014 by Meg   •   Filed under Postpartum Depression

 

Postpartum depression (PPD) can wreak havoc on the psyches of new mothers as well as their partners, leading some therapists to treat entire families for PPD issues as opposed to just women. But how to know if you or your partner has such a thing? I have a few recent posts that go into more detail on this (see those links below this teaser). But I was recently asked to answer this question quick and dirty style in a guest post, so I created a PPD symptom checklist. If this sounds like you (or someone close to you), share it with your partner. You’re not crazy. It’s postpartum depression. And help is available....  continue reading

Things You Probably Don't Know About Postpartum Depression: Breastfeeding and The Influence of Hormones

Monday, August 18, 2014 by Meg   •   Filed under Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression is an evolutionarily relevant hormonal response to stress that may be triggered by a lack of support or other environmental conditions. (Read more here in: PPD, Maternal Investment Theory and the Drive to Abandon and PPD, Spousal Support and the Benefit of Sister Wives. ) 

But breastfeeding may be an additional piece to the postnatal depression puzzle. 

Let me be clear: this is not a post about encouraging women to breastfeed as opposed to bottle feed. This is not a post shaming mothers for whatever choices they have made in the feeding realm. Every mother does what she feels is right for her and her child. 

This post is about us. Because maternal emotional regulation might be affected by breastfeeding, and the cessation of breastfeeding may be able to trigger mental health issues, including postpartum depression. Education matters so that women can understand the process and make the best choice for themselves and their families, whatever that choice happens to be....  continue reading

Things You Probably Don't Know About Postpartum Depression: Spousal Support and the Benefit of Sister Wives

Friday, August 15, 2014 by Meg   •   Filed under Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression sucks, but it might be biologically relevant as a mechanism to regulate investment drives, AKA The "Awww he's so cute we should totally keep him until he can have kids of his own drive" (Read more about it here in PPD, Maternal Investment Theory and the Drive to Abandon).  However, according to evolutionary psychologist Edward Hagan, there might be another reason for postpartum depression symptoms: negotiating greater care from others1

A theory otherwise known as, "Look, you help me do this, or I am not doing it at all, dammit."

But, you know, subconscious. Edward Hagan thinks we’re all as manipulative as our mother-in-laws....  continue reading

Things You Probably Don't Know About Postpartum Depression: Maternal Investment Theory and The Drive to Abandon

Monday, August 11, 2014 by Meg   •   Filed under Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression affects up to one-fifth of women and has a wide range of symptoms, including anxiety, guilt, depression, intrusive thoughts of infant or self harm, numbness, anger or irritability, trouble sleeping and issues with focus. As opposed to being a simple "after birth" phenomenon, PPD may start during pregnancy or emerge up to a year following birth (though it is more commonly reported in the first month postpartum). It can be a nightmare for women whose vision of early parenthood is shattered by distressing symptoms, hopelessness, helplessness and fear.

But, postpartum depression may be a biological necessity. While symptoms of postpartum depression can make anyone feel like they are losing their mind, a growing body of research supports the idea that postpartum depression is a part of a beneficial mechanism as opposed to dysfunction.

I know it doesn't feel normal, not one bit. But it might be....  continue reading