The Minimalist Guide to Internal Working Models: How Early Experience Shapes Later Relationships

Tuesday, November 22, 2016 by Meg   •   Filed under Sexuality/Relationships

Early life experiences can shape our later relationships and our emotional profiles. 

Upset that you inherited their father's nose? You may have gotten his trust issues as well.

Internal Working Models of Relationships

Your internal working model refers to how you see the world and predict events. An individual's internal working model of relationships is formed in response to the type of care they receive early on. In essence, early attachment changes how you come to see your later relationships and the amount of trust you have for partners. It can also be passed down through generations because it changes how people respond to their own children....  continue reading

Platonic Friendships, Friends With Benefits and Relationship Complications

Tuesday, November 08, 2016 by Meg   •   Filed under Sexuality/Relationships

In relationship therapy sessions, there is often another individual in the background, underlying arguments and punctuating negative feelings: the platonic opposite sex friend. Often men and women have difficulty seeing eye to eye on this issue. 

But it isn’t their fault. It’s all part of an evolved mechanism that may lead men and women to see these relationships in very different contexts, either subconsciously or right out in the open. But without understanding those elements, it is difficult to work through them....  continue reading

Is America Being Overmedicated? Suffering From Undertreatment

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 by Meg   •   Filed under General

 

In part one of this series, we saw that the pharmaceutical industry has evolved to influence modern care practices in ways that directly impact our health. In part two, we explored the ways that marketing can potentially trigger individuals to seek medications they may not benefit from

However, the issues of overdiagnosis and overmedication pale in comparison to undertreatment....  continue reading

Is America Being Overmedicated? Making People Sick to Make Them Well

Tuesday, October 18, 2016 by Meg   •   Filed under General

In the last post, (Is America Being Overmedicated? Money, Medicine and the Pharmaceutical Industry) we explored the influence of the pharmaceutical industry on health care, the impact of biased research studies and the evolution of big money in health treatment. It is obvious that the drug companies exert a great deal of influence over modern health care practices. 

But how exactly does it trickle down to us?...  continue reading

Is American Being Overmedicated? Money, Medication and the Pharmaceutical Industry

Wednesday, October 12, 2016 by Meg   •   Filed under General

There are many who believe that some normal personalities are patholgized—treated like illness—in a culture where only certain

traits are rewarded (click here for more on that). There is also a tendency to look down on those who have traits that don’t mesh with our society’s version of success. 

However, whether we overmedicate individuals for these traits is a hot button topic.  

Many believe that people are prone to seek drugs based on a misunderstanding of symptoms or for “quick fix” reasons. Others think that parents and schools are actively trying to medicate children to make their lives easier. 

So, are people actually being overmedicated for mental health problems?...  continue reading

The Hippies Were Right: Healing Trauma With Yoga

Tuesday, September 27, 2016 by Meg   •   Filed under Treatment Techniques

Post-traumatic stress disorder can come with difficult symptoms, many of them physical. Some people with a history of trauma have a constant heaviness in the chest, some have muscle tension or pain. Others experience continuous feelings of helplessness, hopelessness or flashbacks. Most have some difficulty regulating their emotions and may suffer from distorted body image or difficulties in personal relationships. Still others numb emotions with substances , rely on distractions like high-risk behaviors or use self injury to ward off the internal pain with an external distraction (read more on the symptoms of trauma in The Evolution of PTSD).

But some feel far less due to self protection in the form of dissociation or disconnection, some detaching so cleanly that they may have to look at their arm to know it’s moving at all. But this disconnection from body and emotion is usually imperfect, with individuals experiencing breakthrough symptoms at unexpected times, suddenly panicking at a particular noise or freezing mid conversation. Childhood trauma in particular often hides until a later date when the individual is more able to handle the discomfort, leading some to wonder, “I didn’t feel this bad then! Why is this happening now?” 

Congratulations, you’re healing. It feels shitty but it means your brain and your body are finally dealing with what happened. You are no longer fully disconnected. And you now have a chance to take back your body....  continue reading